WOULD YOU BE ASSUMED DEAD IF YOU MISSED YOUR LOCAL CHURCH’S PRAYER MEETING ?

I was recently struck by an article asking this provocative question, based on a talk given by J. A. Spurgeon who assisted his more famous, older brother C. H. Spurgeon at the Metropolitan Tabernacle in the nineteenth century. One cannot but wonder how many church members today would be assumed dead if they missed two church prayer meetings in a row?

At the prayer-meeting; or dead ?

A few words spoken at a tabernacle prayer meeting by pastor J.A. Spurgeon

There never was a prayer-meeting held without Mrs. W—— being present. Whether I was there or not, she was. Once, about six months ago, she was absent; but when I asked her where she had been, she said:

I came there, and put the books down, although I could not stop to the meeting.

She had come to the chapel, and reported herself, and then gone off to see someone who was ill. That was the only time I ever knew her to be away from a prayer-meeting until last Sunday evening, when I missed her again. I asked my deacons if they had seen her, or heard anything of her, and they said:

We do not know where she is, but she was not with us last Friday night, at the prayer-meeting.

I said that I was sure she was dead, for if she had been alive she would have been certain to have been at the prayer-meeting. Nobody questioned what I said. All felt with me that she would not have missed two consecutive prayer-meetings unless she had been dead, or too ill to leave her house. During the evening service one of the deacons went off to where she lived all by herself, and, not being able to make anybody hear, he obtained assistance, and broke into the house. There he found just what we expected; she was there, upon her knees, dead, in her little parlour, and she must have died in great suffering, and in the act of praying to God.

She was a remarkable character. She visited and gave away tracts in the worst street in Croydon, and she had a singularly happy way of getting hold of very wicked people, to whom she would tell the story of her own life, and say that she used to be just like them, but by the grace of God she had been converted, and that grace which had don so much for her could do the same for them.

There is a story told as an instance of the pranks that used to be played upon her. A young man thought that he would frighten her; so he dressed himself up as nearly like the devil as his imagination enabled him to do, and when she knocked at his door, he opened it, and called out:

I am the devil,

and began to shout at her. Without being at all alarmed, she quietly put on her glasses, and looked him up and down, and said:

You ain’t the devil, you are only one of his children.

I thought the old lady had the best of it that time. I asked her if she ever saw him again, and she replied:

Oh dear, no! He just put his head in, and went off.

We shall sorely miss her; our prayer-meetings will have a blank through Mrs. W——’s absence that we shall not easily make up. I hope some of you will be such constant attendants at the prayer-meeting that if you are absent twice we shall say of you:

I am sure our brother or sister must be dead,

although we do not want to have you departing from us so suddenly as did our good friend at Croydon.

 

(Taken from The Sword and Trowel: 1884 pages 89 – 90)

Back to blog
Click here to find out what this means

© 2018 Kensit Evangelical Church - All rights reserved

Website by Cloud 10